California Golden Bears

California Golden Bears
Logo
UniversityUniversity of California, Berkeley
ConferencePac-12 (primary)
Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (men's gymnastics, indoor track & field, water polo)
America East (field hockey)
NCAADivision I (FBS)
Athletic directorJim Knowlton
LocationBerkeley, California
Varsity teams30 (14 men’s, 16 women’s)
Football stadiumCalifornia Memorial Stadium
Basketball arenaHaas Pavilion
Baseball stadiumEvans Diamond
Softball stadiumLevine-Fricke Field
Soccer stadiumEdwards Stadium
Other venuesClark Kerr Sand Courts
MascotOski the Bear
NicknameGolden Bears
Fight songFight for California
CheerOski Yell
ColorsBlue and gold
 
Websitewww.calbears.com

The California Golden Bears are the athletic teams that represent the University of California, Berkeley. Referred to in athletic competition as California or Cal, the university fields 30 varsity athletic programs and various club teams in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)'s Division I primarily as a member of the Pac-12 Conference, and for a limited number of sports as a member of the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (MPSF). Over the course of the school's history, California has won team national titles in 13 men's and 3 women's sports and 115 team titles overall. Cal athletes have also competed in the Olympics for a host of different countries. Notable facilities used by the Bears include California Memorial Stadium (football) and Haas Pavilion (basketball and other indoor sports). Cal finished the 2010–11 athletic season with 1,219.50 points, earning third place in the Director's Cup standings, the Golden Bears' highest finish ever. Cal did not receive any points for its national championships in rugby and men's crew because those sports are not governed by the NCAA. Cal finished 12th in the 2014-15 standings.

In 2014, Cal instituted a strict academic standard for an athlete's admission to the university. By the 2017 academic year 80 percent of incoming student athletes were required to comply with the University of California general student requirement of having a 3.0 or higher high school grade point average.

California's nickname originated in 1895 during California's dominant track and field team's tour of Midwest and Eastern universities. A blue silk banner with the golden grizzly bear, the state symbol, was displayed by the team during that tour. Since then, Cal's athletic teams have been known as the Golden Bears.

After more than 100 years in the Pac-12 Conference, California is set to join the Atlantic Coast Conference in 2024.

Varsity programs

Men's sports Women's sports
Baseball Basketball
Basketball Beach volleyball
Cross country Cross country
Football Field hockey
Golf Golf
Gymnastics Gymnastics
Rowing Lacrosse
Rugby Rowing
Soccer Soccer
Swimming and diving Softball
Tennis Swimming and diving
Track and field Tennis
Water polo Track and field
Volleyball
Water polo
† – Track and field includes both indoor and outdoor

Men's varsity programs

Football

The California football team began play in 1885 and has played its home games at California Memorial Stadium since 1923, except for in 2011 while the stadium was being renovated; the team played at San Francisco's AT&T Park that season. The Bears have five national titles bestowed retrospectively by "major selectors" — 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923 and 1937 (a contemporaneous selector in 1937 also chose California) — listed by the NCAA. The team also has produced two of the oddest and most memorable plays in college football: Roy "Wrong Way" Riegels' fumble recovery and run toward the Cal goal line in the 1929 Rose Bowl; and The Play in the 1982 Big Game, a game-winning, five-lateral kickoff return as time expired.

The program has produced numerous NFL stars, including:

Current head coach Justin Wilcox began his tenure in 2017.

California has participated in 25 bowl games, garnering a record of 12–12–1.

Year Coach Bowl Opponent Result
1920 Andy Smith Rose Ohio State W 28–0
1921 Andy Smith Rose Washington & Jefferson T 0–0
1928 Nibs Price Rose Georgia Tech L 7–8
1937 Stub Allison Rose Alabama W 13–0
1948 Pappy Waldorf Rose Northwestern L 14–20
1949 Pappy Waldorf Rose Ohio State L 14–17
1950 Pappy Waldorf Rose Michigan L 6–14
1958 Pete Elliott Rose Iowa L 12–38
1979 Roger Theder Garden State Temple L 17–28
1990 Bruce Snyder Copper Wyoming W 17–15
1991 Bruce Snyder Citrus Clemson W 37–13
1993 Keith Gilbertson Alamo Iowa W 37–3
1996 Steve Mariucci Aloha Navy L 38–42
2003 Jeff Tedford Insight Virginia Tech W 52–49
2004 Jeff Tedford Holiday Texas Tech L 31–45
2005 Jeff Tedford Las Vegas BYU W 35–28
2006 Jeff Tedford Holiday Texas A&M W 45–10
2007 Jeff Tedford Armed Forces Air Force W 42–36
2008 Jeff Tedford Emerald Miami W 24–17
2009 Jeff Tedford Poinsettia Utah L 27–37
2011 Jeff Tedford Holiday Texas L 10–21
2015 Sonny Dykes Armed Forces Air Force W 55–36
2018 Justin Wilcox Cheez-It Bowl TCU L 7–10
2019 Justin Wilcox Redbox Bowl Illinois W 35–20
2023 Justin Wilcox Independence Bowl Texas Tech Red Raiders L 14-34

Basketball

The California men's basketball team has represented the University of California intercollegiately since 1907 and subsequently began full conference play in 1915. Cal basketball's home court is Haas Pavilion, which was constructed atop of the old Harmon Gymnasium using money donated in the late 1990s in part by the owners of Levi-Strauss. The program has seen success throughout the years culminating in a national championship in 1959 under legendary coach Pete Newell and have reached the final four two other times in 1946 and 1960. The 1926–27 team finished the season with a 17–0 record and was retroactively named the national champion by the Premo-Porretta Power Poll.

The current head coach of the California men's basketball program is Mark Madsen. Some notable NBA players that spent time playing in Berkeley include Jaylen Brown, Jason Kidd, Kevin Johnson, and Darrall Imhoff.

Baseball

Cal baseball players at Jackie Robinson Stadium in 2007

The Cal baseball team plays at Evans Diamond, located between Haas Pavilion, the Recreational Sports Facility (RSF), and Edward's Track Stadium. Cal has appeared in the post-season a total of nine times, including five times in the College World Series; Cal won the title in 1947 and 1957. The team is currently coached by Mike Neu, who took the helm in 2018.

In September 2010, the university announced that baseball would be one of five sports cut as a cost-cutting measure. However, in April 2011, after receiving more than $9 million in pledges from supporters of the program, the program was reinstated. In June 2011, the team made its most recent appearance in the College World Series.

Perhaps the most famous Cal player was second baseman Jeff Kent, who led the Golden Bears to the 1988 College World Series, and would go on to be named the 2000 National League Most Valuable Player as a member of the San Francisco Giants. Shortstop Geoff Blum of Cal's 1992 College World Series team hit the game-winning home run in the 14th inning of Game 3 of the 2005 World Series for the Chicago White Sox.

Current Golden Bears in Major League Baseball include New York Mets outfielder Mark Canha, Texas Rangers shortstop Marcus Semien, and Chicago White Sox first baseman and left fielder Andrew Vaughn. Vaughn is Cal's highest ever MLB draft selection, having been selected third overall by the White Sox in 2019. San Diego Padres manager Bob Melvin also played at Cal, having helped the team earn third place in the 1980 College World Series.

Bowling (discontinued)

Men's bowling was a varsity-level intercollegiate sport at the University of California in the 1970s and won a national championship in 1979, governed by the ABC (now the U.S. Bowling Congress).

Crew

Crew (rowing) has a long and storied history as the oldest sport at the university, beginning with the formation of the University of California Boat Club in 1875. Competitive racing as known today began in 1893. In 1928, 1932, and 1948, Cal crews won gold at the Olympics while representing the United States.

National champions:

  • Varsity 8 (19): 1928, 1932, 1934, 1935, 1939, 1949, 1960, 1961, 1964, 1976, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2016, 2022, 2023
  • Second varsity 8 (11): 1941, 1947, 1951, 1959, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2014, 2019, 2023
  • Freshman 8 (9): 1938, 1982, 1998, 2000, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2011
  • Third varsity 8 (2): 2014, 2023
  • Varsity 4 with coxswain (5): 2001, 2002, 2007, 2009, 2023

Cross country

The University of California's intercollegiate cross country team is under the direction of head coach Bobby Lockhart, who took over the program in 2019 after spending time at UNC-Chapel Hill and Oklahoma State.

The California Golden Bears men's cross country team appeared in the NCAA tournament five times, with their highest finish being 16th place in the 2007–08 school year.

Year Gender Ranking Points
2007 Men No. 16 434
2008 No. 22 477
2010 No. 31 678
2015 No. 23 524
2016 No. 31 776

Rifle (discontinued)

Men's rifle began intercollegiate competition at the University of California in the 19th century and won 5 national championships in the 1950s. At that time, the national event required five firing members per team, one alternate, a team captain and a coach. The national championship competition consisted of ten shots per firing member at 50 feet, indoors.

Rugby

The Golden Bears rugby team has won 33 championships since the national collegiate championships for rugby began in 1980. Current head coach and Cal alumnus Jack Clark took over the team in 1984, and has achieved prolonged success, leading the Bears to 28 national titles, including twelve consecutive championships from 1991 to 2002, five more consecutive titles from 2004 to 2008, and back-to-back titles in 2010 to 2011 and 2016 to 2017.

Cal's rugby game against the Saint Mary's Gaels in 2010

Cal also has competed in the Collegiate Rugby Championship (CRC), the highest profile college rugby sevens tournament in the U.S., winning the title each year from 2013 to 2017. The CRC was held every June from 2011 through 2019 at Subaru Park in the Philadelphia area. Cal also reached the finals of the 2010 CRC, losing to Utah in sudden death extra time, and finished third in the 2012 CRC. Cal won the 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016 CRC titles.

In September 2010, the university announced that rugby would be one of five varsity sports cut as a cost-cutting measure, though the team would have continued to represent the university as a "varsity club sport." A large group of rugby supporters organized to oppose the relegation. On February 11, 2011, the administration reversed its decision on rugby and two other sports, thus continuing them as sponsored varsity sports.

Soccer

Men's soccer began intercollegiate competition at the University of California in 1906 and has won no national championships and 4 conference championships. The team currently plays its home games at Edwards Stadium and the head coach (in his 12th season) is Kevin Grimes. Steve Birnbaum was the #2 pick in the first round in the 2014 MLS SuperDraft.

The California Golden Bears men's soccer team has an NCAA Division I Tournament record of 14–19 through nineteen appearances.

Year Record Seed Region Round Opponent Results
1960 6–2 St. Louis Quarterfinal Saint Louis L 0–2
1977 11–5–3 San Francisco Second Round UCLA L 1–3
1981 13–5–1 Berkeley First round San Diego State L 0–4
1983 17–3 Las Vegas First round UNLV L 1–3 (OT)
1985 16–4–1 Los Angeles First round UCLA L 1–3
1986 15–4–2 St. Louis First round Saint Louis L 0–2
1996 12–6–2 Seattle First round Fresno State L 1–2
2001 10–8–1 Stanford First round Santa Clara L 0–1 (3OT)
2002 13–5–2 Los Angeles Second Round
Third round
UC Santa Barbara
UCLA
W 2–1
L 1–2
2003 10–8–2 New York First round
Second Round
San Jose State
UC Santa Barbara
W 2–0
L 0–2
2004 12–3–3 Indianapolis First round
Second Round
Santa Clara
No. 7 SMU
W 2–1 (OT)
L 0–1
2005 13–3–2 No. 7 Albuquerque Second Round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Santa Clara
Wake Forest
No. 2 New Mexico
T 0–0 (PK)
W 3–2 (2OT)
L 0–1
2006 12–5–1 No. 13 Charlottesville Second Round
Third round
New Mexico
No. 4 Virginia
W 3–1
L 1–2
2007 11–5–2 Providence First round
Second Round
UC Davis
No. 11 Virginia Tech
W 2–1 (OT)
L 2–3
2008 11–5–2 College Park First round
Second Round
Third round
San Francisco
No. 15 UC Santa Barbara
No. 2 Maryland
W 3–0
W 3–2 (2OT)
L 1–2
2010 12–2–3 No. 6 Akron Second Round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Santa Barbara
Brown
No. 3 Akron
W 2–1 (OT)
W 2–0
T 3–3 (PK)
2013 12–4–2 No. 4 Berkeley Second Round
Third round
Quarterfinals
Bradley
Coastal Carolina
No. 5 Maryland
W 3–1
W 1–0
W 1–0
L 1–2
2014 12–4–2 No. 15 Los Angeles Second Round
Third round
SIU Edwardsville
No. 2 UCLA
W 1–0
L 2–3

Tennis

Doug Eisenman won the NCAA Division I doubles title with Matt Lucena in 1990.

Water polo

The California Golden Bears men's water polo team have an NCAA Division I Tournament record of 58–15 through twenty-nine appearances.

Year Round Opponent Result
1969 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
UC Irvine
UC Santa Barbara
UCLA
W 5–4
W 6–4
L 2–5
1973 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
New Mexico
UCLA
UC Irvine
W 8–1
W 4–2
W 8–4
1974 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
Air Force
CSU Fullerton
UC Irvine
W 12–3
W 12–3
W 7–6
1975 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
Long Beach State
UCLA
UC Irvine
W 9–6
W 13–9
W 9–8
1977 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
Bucknell
Pepperdine
UC Irvine
W 28–10
W 11–10
W 8–6
1978 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
Texas A&M
UC Irvine
Stanford
W 15–6
W 7–5
L 6–7
1979 First round
Semifinals
Air Force
UCLA
W 19–7
L 9–10
1980 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
UC Santa Barbara
UC Irvine
Stanford
W 11–7
W 9–7
L 6–8
1981 First round
Semifinals
UCLA
Long Beach State
W 10–7
L 9–11
1982 First round
Semifinals
USC
UC Irvine
W 7–6
L 5–8
1983 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
Slippery Rock
Long Beach State
USC
W 15–2
W 8–5
W 10–7
1984 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
Loyola (IL)
USC
Stanford
W 11–3
W 10–9
W 9–8
1986 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
Brown
UCLA
Stanford
W 11–4
W 11–8
L 6–9
1987 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
Brown
UC Irvine
USC
W 18–3
W 7–3
W 9–8
1988 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
UALR
Stanford
UCLA
W 17–6
W 10–6
W 14–11
1989 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
Brown
Pepperdine
UC Irvine
W 15–2
W 10–9
L 8–9
1990 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
Brown
UCLA
Stanford
W 16–6
W 10–8
W 8–7
1991 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
Navy
UC Irvine
UCLA
W 13–6
W 13–10
W 7–6
1992 First round
Semifinals
National Championship
Navy
UC Irvine
Stanford
W 15–2
W 8–5
W 12–11
1993 First round
Semifinals
Massachusetts
USC
W 17–4
L 11–12
1994 First round
Semfiinals
Massachusetts
USC
W 12–7
L 6–11
1995 Semifinals
National Championship
Massachusetts
UCLA
W 10–6
L 8–10
2002 Semifinals
National Championship
Queens College
Stanford
W 14–6
L 6–7
2006 Semifinals
National Championship
UC San Diego
USC
W 17–7
W 7–6
2007 Semifinals
National Championship
Navy
USC
W 8–5
W 8–6
2010 Semifinals
National Championship
Loyola Marymount
USC
W 7–6
L 10–12
2015 Semifinals USC L 6–9
2016 Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship
PomonaPitzer
UCLA
USC
W 16–6
W 9–8
W 11–8
2017 Semifinals USC L 11–12
2023 Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship
UCLA W 16–6
W 10–9
W 13–11

Women's varsity programs

Volleyball

Cal women's volleyball team in 2009

The California Golden Bears women's volleyball team have an NCAA Division I Tournament record of 26–17 through seventeen appearances. Despite appearing in the NCAA national championship game in 2010, they have yet to win a national title. Some former Bears that have gone pro include all-time kills leader Hana Cutura, former US Olympian and all-time assists leader Carli Lloyd, Mia Jerkov, Lara Vukasovic, Jenelle Jordan, and Maddie Haynes. The team is currently coached by Sam Crosson.

Year Round Opponent Result
1981
AIAW
Pool Play
Pool Play
Consolation
9th Place Game
Utah State
Minnesota
North Carolina
Pittsburgh
L 2-3
L 2-3
W 2-0
L 1-2
1982 First round
Regional semifinals
Pepperdine
San Diego State
W 3–0
L 1–3
1983 First round
Regional semifinals
Oregon State
Pacific
W 3–2
L 0–3
1987 First round UCLA L 1–3
1988 First round UCLA L 0–3
1989 First round
Regional semifinals
Florida State
Texas
W 3–1
L 0–3
2002 First round
Second Round
Santa Clara
UC Santa Barbara
W 3–1
L 0–3
2003 First round
Second Round
Regional semifinals
Saint Mary's
Michigan
Georgia Tech
W 3–0
W 3–0
L 1–3
2004 First round
Second Round
Pacific
Saint Mary's
W 3–2
L 2–3
2005 First round
Second Round
Valparaiso
Wisconsin
W 3–0
L 0–3
2006 First round
Second Round
Regional semifinals
LSU
Cal Poly
Stanford
W 3–0
W 3–1
L 0–3
2007 First round
Second Round
Regional semifinals
Regional Finals
Semifinals
Liberty
Duke
Iowa State
Nebraska
Penn State
W 3–1
W 3–1
W 3–0
W 3–0
L 0–3
2008 First round
Second Round
Regional semifinals
Regional Finals
Siena
New Mexico State
Illinois
Penn State
W 3–0
W 3–1
W 3–0
L 0–3
2009 First round
Second Round
Regional semifinals
Regional Finals
Lipscomb
Ohio State
Baylor
Penn State
W 3–0
W 3–1
W 3–0
L 0–3
2010 First round
Second Round
Regional semifinals
Regional Finals
Semifinals
National Championship
Utah State
North Carolina
Minnesota
Washington
USC
Penn State
W 3–0
W 3–0
W 3–0
W 3–0
W 3–0
L 0–3
2011 First round North Carolina L 2–3
2012 First round North Carolina L 1–3
2013 First round
Second Round
North Carolina
Wisconsin
W 3–0
L 0–3

Basketball

The 2012 Cal Women's Basketball team before a game

California's women's basketball team has made 14 NCAA tournament appearances, their best result being a Final Four appearance in 2013. The team has also won one WNIT championship, in 2010.

In 2009–10, under Joanne Boyle, the Bears's top-10 recruiting class and star senior Alexis Gray-Lawson) rebounded from a rough start to their season to win the WNIT. The championship game against Miami (FL) was the first ever championship game held at Haas Pavilion. Gray-Lawson ended her career as the all-time Cal leader in three points made and games played.

In 2012–13, under second-year head coach Lindsay Gottlieb, the Cal women reached a record AP and USA Today Coaches Poll #6 ranking at the end of the season, earning the 2 seed in the Spokane region of the NCAA tournament. The Bears reached the first Final Four in school history. In June 2019, Gottlieb became the first NCAA women's head coach to be hired to an NBA coaching staff when she became an assistant coach for the Cleveland Cavaliers.

The current women's basketball head coach is Charmin Smith. Notable alumni of the team include first-round WNBA draft selections Layshia Clarendon and Kristine Anigwe. Anigwe holds the team's all-time scoring and rebounding records.

Softball

Cal softball team (wearing pink because of "strike out cancer" day), winners in 2012

In 2002, the Cal softball team won its first national championship against Arizona. Some notable players include Candace Harper, third baseman, and Jocelyn Forest, pitcher, both of whom were team captains. The 2002 Women's College World Series took place in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Softball began intercollegiate competition at the University of California in 1972. The team has won one national championship and 6 conference championships. The team currently plays at the 1,204 seat Levine-Fricke Field in Strawberry Canyon, and the current head coach is former Cal shortstop Chelsea Spencer, who was a member of the 2002 WCWS-winning team.

Note: Both Cal and the NCAA consider appearances at the AIAW women's final tournament (which was also named and promoted as the "Women's College World Series"), prior to the first NCAA softball WCWS on May 27–30, 1982, to be equivalent to NCAA WCWS appearances.

Cross country

The California Golden Bears women's cross country team appeared in the NCAA tournament four times, with their highest finish being 9th place in the 1988–89 school year.

Year Gender Ranking Points
1984 Women No. 15 323
1988 No. 9 236
2011 No. 18 433
2017 No. 22 530

Field hockey

Cal was a member of the Northern Pacific Field Hockey Conference (NorPac) from the league's founding in 1982 until its demise at the end of the 2014 season. The four NorPac members from California (Cal, Pacific, Stanford, and UC Davis) became single-sport members of the America East Conference starting with the 2015 season.

The California Golden Bears women's hockey team have an NCAA Division I Tournament record of 1–10 through ten appearances.

Year Round Opponent Result
1980
AIAW
First round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
National Championship
Ursinus
New Hampshire
San Jose State
Penn State
W 1-0
W 2-0
W 2-1 (2ot)
L 1-2
1981
AIAW
Quarterfinals
Consolation
5th Place Game
Temple
Virginia
Washington State
L 1-3
W 3-0
W 1-0 (ot)
1982 First round
Quarterfinals
San Jose State
Penn State
W 2–1 (2ot)
L 1–2 (2ot, ps)
1983 First round North Carolina L 1–2
1992 Ball State L 0–1
1993 Northwestern L 2–3
1994 Iowa L 2–3
2001 Syracuse L 0–1
2002 Wake Forest L 0–8
2003 Maryland L 0–2
2005 Wake Forest L 0–1
2006 Ohio State L 1–3

Rowing

The 1980 Cal women's crew dominated the national collegiate championships. They won the varsity eight, Cal's first ever varsity national championship in any women's sport, and also captured the varsity four and finished second in the junior varsity eight. The Bears also captured national titles in the varsity four in 1981 and the novice eight in 1984. The team won NCAA championships in 2005, 2006, 2016 and 2018.

Soccer

Women's soccer began intercollegiate competition at the University of California in 1982 and has won no national championships and 1 conference championship. The team currently plays at Edwards Stadium and the head coach (in his 5th season) is Neil McGuire. Notable alums include Olympic Gold Medalist and 2015 and 2019 World Cup Champion Alex Morgan, and Betsy Hassett of the New Zealand Women's National Team.

The California Golden Bears women's soccer team has an NCAA Division I Tournament record of 16–25 through twenty-five appearances.

Year Round Opponent Result
1983 First round
Second Round
Cincinnati
North Carolina
W 5–0
L 2–5
1984 First round
Second Round
Semifinals
UC Santa Barbara
Colorado College
North Carolina
W 2–0
W 1–0
L 1–2
1986 First round
Second Round
CSU East Bay
Colorado College
W 2–0
L 0–1
1987 Second Round
Semifinals
UC Santa Barbara
North Carolina
W 3–0
L 0–4
1988 First round
Second Round
Semifinals
Saint Mary's
Colorado College
NC State
W 2–0
W 2–1
L 0–1
1993 First round Stanford L 0–2
1998 First round Pacific L 1–2
1999 First round BYU L 0–2
2000 Second Round Santa Clara L 0–2
2001 First round Saint Mary's L 2–3
2002 First round
Second Round
Denver
Stanford
W 2–0
L 0–1
2004 First round Santa Clara L 1–2
2005 First round
Second Round
Third round
Rice
UTEP
Florida State
W 2–0
W 2–1
L 1–2
2006 First round
Second Round
Auburn
Florida State
W 3–1
L 1–3
2007 First round
Second Round
Santa Clara
Stanford
W 2–0
L 1–2
2008 First round Florida L 1–2
2009 First round
Second Round
Auburn
Florida State
W 2–1
L 0–3
2010 First round Duke L 1–2
2011 First round
Second Round
Santa Clara
Boston College
W 2–1
L 0–1
2012 First round
Second Round
Pepperdine
San Diego State
W 1–0
L 1–2
2013 First round Santa Clara L 1–2
2014 First round
Second Round
San Diego State
Florida
W 3–2
L 1–3
2015 First round Loyola Marymount L 0–1
2016 First round Pepperdine L 1–2
2017 First round Santa Clara L 1–2

Water polo

Women's Water Polo began intercollegiate competition at the University of California in 1996 and has won no national championships and 2 conference championships. The team currently plays at the Spieker Aquatics Complex near Haas Pavilion and the head coach (in her 2nd season) is Coralie Simmons.

Championships

Appearances

The California Golden Bears competed in the NCAA tournament across 26 active sports (12 men's and 14 women's) 627 times at the Division I Level.

  • Baseball (13): 1947, 1957, 1980, 1985, 1988, 1991, 1992, 1995, 2001, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2015, 2019
  • Men's basketball (19): 1946, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2016
  • Women's basketball (16): 1982 (AIAW), 1990, 1992, 1993, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
  • Men's cross country (5): 2007, 2008, 2010, 2015, 2016
  • Women's cross country (4): 1984, 1988, 2011, 2017
  • Field hockey (12): 1980 (AIAW), 1981 (AIAW), 1982, 1983, 1992, 1993, 1994, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006
  • Men's golf (15): 1939, 1948, 1949, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2004, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2016, 2019
  • Women's golf (10): 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2011, 2014, 2015, 2017
  • Men's gymnastics (48): 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1982, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2018, 2019, 2021, 2022
  • Women's gymnastics (15): 1992, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2022
  • Rowing (21): 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
  • Men's soccer (20): 1960, 1977, 1981, 1983, 1985, 1986, 1996, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2013, 2014, 2017, 2019
  • Women's soccer (26): 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1993, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2019
  • Softball (35): 1980 (AIAW), 1981 (AIAW), 1982 (AIAW), 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
  • Men's swimming and diving (56): 1943, 1947, 1951, 1952, 1956, 1957, 1959, 1963, 1968, 1970, 1972, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
  • Women's swimming and diving (37): 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
  • Men's tennis (37): 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
  • Women's tennis (37): 1982 (AIAW), 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2019
  • Men's indoor track and field (17): 1968, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1997, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2017, 2018, 2019
  • Women's indoor track and field (12): 1990, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2016, 2021, 2022
  • Men's outdoor track and field (79): 1922, 1930, 1931, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942 1943, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952 1953, 1954, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, 2017, 2019, 2021, 2022
  • Women's outdoor track and field (29): 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2011, 2012, 2016, 2019, 2021, 2022
  • Women's volleyball (18): 1981 (AIAW), 1982, 1983, 1987, 1988, 1989, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013
  • Men's water polo (30): 1969, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 2002, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2023
  • Women's water polo (7): 2010, 2011, 2014, 2015, 2017, 2019

Team

The Golden Bears of California earned 43 NCAA championships at the Division I level, plus 5 unofficial men's football titles claimed by the school.

Results

School year Sport Opponent Score
1920–21 Football Ohio State 28–0
1921–22 Football Washington & Jefferson 0–0
1921–22 Men's outdoor track and field Penn State 28.5–19.5
1922–23 Football Stanford 28–0
1923–24 Football Stanford 9–0
1937–38 Football Alabama 13–0
1946–47 Baseball Yale 8–7
1956–57 Baseball Penn State 1–0
1958–59 Men's basketball West Virginia 71–70
1968–69 Men's gymnastics Southern Illinois 188.25–188.15
1973–74 Men's water polo UC Irvine 8–4
1974–75 Men's gymnastics LSU 437.325–433.7
1974–75 Men's water polo UC Irvine 7–6
1975–76 Men's water polo UC Irvine 9–8
1977–78 Men's water polo UC Irvine 9–6
1978–79 Men's swimming and diving USC 287–227
1979–80 Men's swimming and diving Texas 234–220
1983–84 Men's water polo USC 10–7
1984–85 Men's water polo Stanford 9–8
1987–88 Men's water polo USC 9–8
1988–89 Men's water polo UCLA 14–11
1990–91 Men's water polo Stanford 8–7
1991–92 Men's water polo UCLA 7–6
1992–93 Men's water polo Stanford 12–11
1996–97 Men's gymnastics Oklahoma 233.825–232.725
1997–98 Men's gymnastics Iowa 231.2–229.675
2001–02 Softball Arizona 6–0
2003–04 Men's golf UCLA 1,134–1,140
2004–05 Rowing Virginia 67–63
2005–06 Rowing Brown 66–66
2006–07 Men's water polo USC 7–6
2007–08 Men's water polo USC 8–6
2008–09 Women's swimming and diving Georgia 411.5–400.5
2010–11 Men's swimming and diving Texas 493–470.5
2010–11 Women's swimming and diving Georgia 424–394.5
2011–12 Men's swimming and diving Texas 535.5–491
2011–12 Women's swimming and diving Georgia 412.5–366
2013–14 Men's swimming and diving Texas 468.5–417.5
2014–15 Women's swimming and diving Georgia 513–452
2015–16 Rowing Ohio State 129–126
2016–17 Men's water polo USC 11–8
2017–18 Rowing Washington 130–128
2018–19 Men's swimming and diving Texas 560–475
2021–22 Men's water polo USC 13–12
2021–22 Men's swimming and diving Texas 487.5–436.5
2022–23 Men's water polo USC 13–12
2022–23 Men's swimming and diving Arizona State 482–430
2023–24 Men's water polo UCLA 13–11

Below are 72 national team titles in current and former California varsity sports that were not bestowed by the NCAA:

  • Men (70)
    • Bowling (1): 1979
    • Crew (19): 1928, 1932, 1934, 1935, 1939, 1949, 1960, 1961, 1964, 1976, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2016, 2022, 2023
    • Football (5*): 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1937
    • Rifle (9): 1898, 1899, 1902, 1907, 1952, 1955, 1957, 1958, 1959
    • Rugby (27): 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1988, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2016, 2017
    • Rugby 7s (5) (CRC): 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
    • Tennis (2**): 1925, 1926
    • Tennis (indoor) (2): 1980, 1989
  • Women (2)
    • Crew (1): 1980
    • Tennis (indoor) (1): 2016
* Football: as determined by one contemporary and seven retrospective "major selectors" listed in the NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision Records (five of the eight selectors being math systems).: 107–109 
** Unofficial, by virtue of winning both the collegiate individual and doubles crowns of the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association

Below are 60 national team titles won by California club sports teams at the highest collegiate level in non-NCAA sports:

  • Men (10)
    • Badminton (1): 2010
    • Hurling (1): 2013
    • Sailing (match racing) (1): 1975
    • Taekwondo (3): 1976, 1977, 1982
    • Triathlon (4): 2004, 2006, 2008, 2009
  • Women (5)
    • Badminton (2): 2008, 2010
    • Sailing (dinghy) (1): 1978
    • Taekwondo (1): 1976
    • Ultimate (1): 1993
  • Combined (45)
    • Archery (2): mixed recurve – 2016; mixed barebow – 2016
    • Badminton (5): 2000, 2009, 2013, 2015, 2019
    • Cycling (road) (3): 2002, 2003, 2004
    • Taekwondo (28): 1986, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 (tie)
    • Team Tennis (WTT format) (4): 2010, 2012, 2014, 2015
    • Triathlon (3): combined – 2008; team relay – 2012, 2014
For this sport, some years may be missing from this list and hence remain uncounted.
Cal also won the individual women's title at the 2002 intercollegiate cyclo-cross championship held in Yountville, California, and hosted by Cal. In addition, Cal men finished in places 2, 7, 9 and 15. It is unclear whether a team champion was declared. If so, Cal would have won the title.

Individual

As of March 25, 2023, California Golden Bears have won 290 all-time individual championships, including doubles, rowing crews and relay events, in sports currently governed at the Division I level by the NCAA. The eight men's tennis titles won before 1946 were bestowed by the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association. The four women's tennis titles won in 1929–1931 were bestowed at the National Collegiate Girls' Tennis Championships. The four women's rowing titles won in the 1980s were bestowed by the National Women's Rowing Association. The names of the nine women who won the 1984 women's novice eights rowing title have not been retrieved.

NCAA individual championships*
Order School year Athlete(s) Sport Source
1 1921–22 Jack Merchant Men's outdoor track and field
2 1921–22 Jack Merchant Men's outdoor track and field
3 1921–22 Allen Norris Men's outdoor track and field
4 1924–25 Gervais Hills
Gerald Stratford
Men's tennis
5 1924–25 Edward Chandler Men's tennis
6 1924–25 Oather Hampton Men's outdoor track and field
7 1925–26 Edward Chandler Men's tennis
8 1925–26 Edward Chandler
Tom Stow
Men's tennis
1928–29 Josephine Cruickshank Women's tennis doubles
1929–30 Josephine Cruickshank Women's tennis singles
1929–30 Josephine Cruickshank Women's tennis doubles
9 1929–30 Dolf Muehelisen
Robert Muench
Men's tennis
10 1929–30 Kenny Churchill Men's outdoor track and field
11 1930–31 Kenny Churchill Men's outdoor track and field
1930–31 Charlotte Miller Women's tennis doubles
12 1934–35 Richard Bennett
Paul Newton
Men's tennis
13 1935–36 Archie Williams Men's outdoor track and field
14 1936–37 Richard Bennett
Paul Newton
Men's tennis
15 1938–39 Douglas Imhoff
Robert Peacock
Men's tennis
16 1939–40 Martin Biles Men's outdoor track and field
17 1940–41 Martin Biles Men's outdoor track and field
18 1940–41 Guinn Smith Men's outdoor track and field
19 1941–42 Robert Biles Men's outdoor track and field
20 1941–42 Hal Davis Men's outdoor track and field
21 1941–42 Hal Davis Men's outdoor track and field
22 1942–43 Hal Davis Men's outdoor track and field
23 1942–43 Hal Davis Men's outdoor track and field
24 1947–48 Charlie Thompson Men's gymnastics
25 1948–49 Charlie Thompson Men's gymnastics
26 1951–52 Clifton Mayne
Hugh Ditzler
Men's tennis
27 1951–52 Bentley Lyon Wrestling
28 1951–52 George Roseme Men's outdoor track and field
29 1953–54 Lawrence Anderson Men's outdoor track and field
30 1956–57 Don Bowden Men's outdoor track and field
31 1958–59 Art Shurlock Men's gymnastics
32 1959–60 James Fairchild Men's gymnastics
33 1960–61 Paul Davis Men's gymnastics
34 1960–61 James Fairchild Men's gymnastics
35 1961–62 Paul Davis Men's gymnastics
36 1961–62 Roger Olson Men's outdoor track and field
37 1963–64 Al Courchesne
Dave Fishback
Forrest Beaty
Dave Archibald
Men's outdoor track and field
38 1964–65 Chuck Glenn
Dave Fishback
Forrest Beaty
Dave Archibald
Men's outdoor track and field
39 1964–65 Dan Millman Men's gymnastics
40 1966–67 Josh Robinson Men's gymnastics
41 1967–68 Sidney Freudenstein Men's gymnastics
42 1968–69 Dan Bowels Men's gymnastics
43 1969–70 Eddie Hart Men's outdoor track and field
44 1974–75 Tom Beach Men's gymnastics
45 1975–76 Tom Beach Men's gymnastics
46 1975–76 Ed Miller Men's outdoor track and field
47 1976–77 Graham Smith Men's swimming and diving
48 1976–77 Graham Smith Men's swimming and diving
49 1977–78 Peter Rocca
Graham Smith
Pär Arvidsson
Jim Fairbank
Men's swimming and diving
50 1977–78 Peter Rocca Men's swimming and diving
51 1977–78 Graham Smith Men's swimming and diving
52 1978–79 Peter Rocca
Graham Smith
Pär Arvidsson
Per Holmertz
Men's swimming and diving
53 1978–79 Pär Arvidsson Men's swimming and diving
54 1978–79 Pär Arvidsson Men's swimming and diving
55 1978–79 Peter Rocca Men's swimming and diving
56 1978–79 Graham Smith Men's swimming and diving
57 1978–79 Graham Smith Men's swimming and diving
58 1978–79 Graham Smith Men's swimming and diving
59 1979–80 Pär Arvidsson Men's swimming and diving
60 1979–80 Pär Arvidsson Men's swimming and diving
1979–80 Katie Stone
Renee Russak
Joy Stockton
Leanne Cox
Barb O'Neill
Nancy Denison
Kathy Moeller
Alice Lee
Nan Bernadou (cox)
Women's rowing
varsity eight
1979–80 Connie Carpenter
Signe Wallen
Jennifer Scott
Pauline Velez
Robin Kneeland (cox)
Women's rowing
varsity four
1980–81 Signe Wallen
Jennifer Scott
Pauline Velez
two unknown others
Women's rowing
varsity four
61 1980–81 Mark Bergman Men's gymnastics
62 1980–81 Larry Cowling Men's outdoor track and field
63 1981–82 Paolo Revelli
P.A. Magnusson
Todd Trowbridge
Per Holmertz
Men's swimming and diving
64 1981–82 Per Holmertz Men's swimming and diving
65 1981–82 Randall Wickstrom Men's gymnastics
66 1982–83 Mary Meagher Women's swimming and diving
1983–84 nine unknown women Women's rowing
novice eight
67 1984–85 Thomas Lejdström
Michael Söderlund
Bengt Baron
Matt Biondi
Men's swimming and diving
68 1984–85 Michael Söderland
Thomas Lejdström
Bengt Baron
Matt Biondi
Men's swimming and diving
69 1984–85 Conny van Bentum Women's swimming and diving
70 1984–85 Matt Biondi Men's swimming and diving
71 1984–85 Matt Biondi Men's swimming and diving
72 1984–85 Mary Meagher Women's swimming and diving
73 1984–85 Mary Meagher Women's swimming and diving
74 1985–86 Tommy Werner
Thomas Lejdström
Michael Söderlund
Matt Biondi
Men's swimming and diving
75 1985–86 Tommy Werner
Thomas Lejdström
Michael Söderland
Matt Biondi
Men's swimming and diving
76 1985–86 Matt Biondi Men's swimming and diving
77 1985–86 Matt Biondi Men's swimming and diving
78 1985–86 Matt Biondi Men's swimming and diving
79 1985–86 Mary Meagher Women's swimming and diving
80 1985–86 Conny van Bentum Women's swimming and diving
81 1986–87 Tommy Werner
Joel Thomas
Terry DeBiase
Matt Biondi
Men's swimming and diving
82 1986–87 Matt Biondi Men's swimming and diving
83 1986–87 Matt Biondi Men's swimming and diving
84 1986–87 Matt Biondi Men's swimming and diving
85 1986–87 Sheila Hudson Women's outdoor track and field
86 1986–87 Mary Meagher Women's swimming and diving
87 1986–87 Mary Meagher Women's swimming and diving
88 1987–88 Sheila Hudson Women's outdoor track and field
89 1987–88 Hiroko Nagasaki Women's swimming and diving
90 1987–88 Kari Nisula Men's outdoor track and field
91 1989–90 Sheila Hudson Women's indoor track and field
92 1989–90 Sheila Hudson Women's indoor track and field
93 1989–90 Doug Eisenman
Matt Lucena
Men's tennis
94 1989–90 Sheila Hudson Women's outdoor track and field
95 1989–90 Sheila Hudson Women's outdoor track and field
96 1990–91 Matt Lucena
Bent-Ove Pedersen
Men's tennis
97 1992–93 Chris Huffins Men's outdoor track and field
98 1993–94 Jason Bertram Men's gymnastics
99 1993–94 Uğur Taner Men's swimming and diving
100 1994–95 Uğur Taner Men's swimming and diving
101 1995–96 Uğur Taner Men's swimming and diving
102 1997-98 Amanda Augustus
Amy Jensen
Women's tennis
103 1997–98 Josh Birckelbaw Men's gymnastics
104 1998-99 Amanda Augustus
Amy Jensen
Women's tennis
105 1998–99 Marylyn Chiang Women's swimming and diving
106 1998–99 Bartosz Kizierowski Men's swimming and diving
107 1999–00 Matthew Macedo
Anthony Ervin
Bartosz Kizierowski
Lars Merseburg
Men's swimming and diving
108 1999–00 Anya Kolbisen
Haley Cope
Nicole Omphroy
Joscelin Yeo
Women's swimming and diving
109 1999–00 Haley Cope
Staciana Stitts
Waen Minapraphal
Joscelin Yeo
Women's swimming and diving
110 1999–00 Claire Curran
Amy Jensen
Women's tennis
111 1999–00 Michael Ashe Men's gymnastics
112 1999–00 Anthony Ervin Men's swimming and diving
113 1999–00 Anthony Ervin Men's swimming and diving
114 1999–00 Bevan Hart Men's outdoor track and field
115 2000–01 Michael Ashe Men's gymnastics
116 2000–01 Natalie Coughlin Women's swimming and diving
117 2000–01 Natalie Coughlin Women's swimming and diving
118 2000–01 Natalie Coughlin Women's swimming and diving
119 2000–01 Anthony Ervin Men's swimming and diving
120 2001–02 Duje Draganja
Anthony Ervin
Matthew Macedo
Mattias Ohlin
Men's swimming and diving
121 2001–02 Natalie Coughlin Women's swimming and diving
122 2001–02 Natalie Coughlin Women's swimming and diving
123 2001–02 Natalie Coughlin Women's swimming and diving
124 2001–02 Anthony Ervin Men's swimming and diving
125 2001–02 Cody Moore Men's gymnastics
126 2002–03 Duje Draganja
Milorad Čavić
Joe Bruckart
Anthony Ervin
Men's swimming and diving
127 2002–03 Christina Fusano
Raquel Atawo
Women's tennis
128 2002–03 Natalie Coughlin Women's swimming and diving
129 2002–03 Natalie Coughlin Women's swimming and diving
130 2002–03 Natalie Coughlin Women's swimming and diving
131 2002–03 Duje Draganja Men's swimming and diving
132 2003–04 Natalie Coughlin
Erin Reilly
Ashley Chandler
Lauren Medina
Women's swimming and diving
133 2003–04 Graham Ackerman Men's gymnastics
134 2003–04 Graham Ackerman Men's gymnastics
135 2003–04 Natalie Coughlin Women's swimming and diving
136 2003–04 Natalie Coughlin Women's swimming and diving
137 2003–04 Sarah Huarte Women's golf
138 2004–05 Erin Cafaro
Mara Allen
Erin Reinhardt
Iva Obradović
Kim Atkinson
Laura Terheyden
Kaylan Vander
Jelena Djukic
Remy Hitomi
Rowing
139 2004–05 Duje Draganja
Rolandas Gimbutis
Jonas Tilly
Milorad Čavić
Men's swimming and diving
140 2004–05 Duje Draganja
Milorad Čavić
Jonas Tilly
Rolandas Gimbutis
Men's swimming and diving
141 2004–05 Milorad Čavić
Henrique Barbosa
Duje Draganja
Rolandas Gimbutis
Men's swimming and diving
142 2004–05 Graham Ackerman Men's gymnastics
143 2004–05 Duje Draganja Men's swimming and diving
144 2004–05 Duje Draganja Men's swimming and diving
145 2005–06 Suzi Babos Women's tennis
146 2005–06 Henrique Barbosa Men's swimming and diving
147 2005–06 Henrique Barbosa Men's swimming and diving
148 2005–06 Jessica Hardy Women's swimming and diving
149 2005–06 Tim McNeill Men's gymnastics
150 2005–06 Helen Silver Women's swimming and diving
151 2006–07 Emily Silver
Erin Reilly
Jessica Hardy
Dana Vollmer
Women's swimming and diving
152 2006–07 Dana Vollmer
Emily Silver
Blake Hayter
Erin Reilly
Women's swimming and diving
153 2006–07 Lauren Rogers
Jessica Hardy
Dana Vollmer
Emily Silver
Women's swimming and diving
154 2006–07 Kelechi Anyanwu Women's outdoor track and field
155 2006–07 Jessica Hardy Women's swimming and diving
156 2006–07 Alysia Montaño Women's indoor track and field
157 2006–07 Alysia Montaño Women's outdoor track and field
158 2006–07 Tim McNeill Men's gymnastics
159 2006–07 Tim McNeill Men's gymnastics
160 2006–07 Patrick O'Neil Men's swimming and diving
161 2006–07 Dana Vollmer Women's swimming and diving
162 2007–08 Tim McNeill Men's gymnastics
163 2007–08 Tim McNeill Men's gymnastics
164 2007–08 Katie Morgan Women's outdoor track and field
165 2008–09 Hannah Wilson
Liv Jensen
Erica Dagg
Dana Vollmer
Women's swimming and diving
166 2008–09 Sara Isaković
Hannah Wilson
Liv Jensen
Dana Vollmer
Women's swimming and diving
167 2008–09 Mari Andersson
Jana Juricová
Women's tennis
168 2008–09 Nathan Adrian Men's swimming and diving
169 2008–09 Nathan Adrian Men's swimming and diving
170 2008–09 Damir Dugonjič Men's swimming and diving
171 2008–09 Martin Marić Men's outdoor track and field
172 2008–09 Evan Roth Men's gymnastics
173 2008–09 Amanda Sims Women's swimming and diving
174 2008–09 Dana Vollmer Women's swimming and diving
175 2008–09 Dana Vollmer Women's swimming and diving
176 2009–10 Nathan Adrian
Graeme Moore
Joshua Daniels
Guy Barnea
Men's swimming and diving
177 2009–10 Graeme Moore
Joshua Daniels
Tom Shields
Nathan Adrian
Men's swimming and diving
178 2009–10 Guy Barnea
Damir Dugonjič
Graeme Moore
Joshua Daniels
Men's swimming and diving
179 2009–10 Guy Barnea
Damir Dugonjič
Tom Shields
Nathan Thomas
Men's swimming and diving
180 2009–10 Nathan Adrian Men's swimming and diving
181 2009–10 Damir Dugonjič Men's swimming and diving
182 2009–10 Liv Jensen Women's swimming and diving
183 2009–10 Tom Shields Men's swimming and diving
184 2010–11 Becca Lindquist
Kyndal Mancho
Charlotte Palmer
Catherine Shannon
Lynn Anderson
Rowing
185 2010–11 Graeme Moore
Joshua Daniels
Tom Shields
Nathan Adrian
Men's swimming and diving
186 2010–11 Guy Barnea
Damir Dugonjič
Graeme Moore
Nathan Adrian
Men's swimming and diving
187 2010–11 Guy Barnea
Damir Dugonjič
Tom Shields
Nathan Adrian
Men's swimming and diving
188 2010–11 Hannah Wilson
Colleen Fotsch
Erica Dagg
Liv Jensen
Women's swimming and diving
189 2010–11 Cindy Tran
Caitlin Leverenz
Colleen Fotsch
Liv Jensen
Women's swimming and diving
190 2010–11 Cindy Tran
Caitlin Leverenz
Amanda Sims
Liv Jensen
Women's swimming and diving
191 2010–11 Nathan Adrian Men's swimming and diving
192 2010–11 Nathan Adrian Men's swimming and diving
193 2010–11 Damir Dugonjič Men's swimming and diving
194 2010–11 Jana Juricová Women's tennis
195 2010–11 Michael Morrison Men's outdoor track and field
196 2010–11 Tom Shields Men's swimming and diving
197 2010–11 Amanda Sims Women's swimming and diving
198 2010–11 Cindy Tran Women's swimming and diving
199 2011–12 Tyler Messerschmidt
Shayne Fleming
Fabio Gimondi
Seth Stubblefield
Men's swimming and diving
200 2011–12 Mathias Gydesen
Nolan Koon
Tom Shields
Tyler Messerschmidt
Men's swimming and diving
201 2011–12 Cindy Tran
Caitlin Leverenz
Colleen Fotsch
Liv Jensen
Women's swimming and diving
202 2011–12 Cindy Tran
Caitlin Leverenz
Sara Isaković
Katherine Raatz
Women's swimming and diving
203 2011–12 Will Hamilton Men's swimming and diving
204 2011–12 Glen Ishino Men's gymnastics
205 2011–12 Sara Isaković Women's swimming and diving
206 2011–12 Liv Jensen Women's swimming and diving
207 2011–12 Caitlin Leverenz Women's swimming and diving
208 2011–12 Caitlin Leverenz Women's swimming and diving
209 2011–12 Tom Shields Men's swimming and diving
210 2011–12 Tom Shields Men's swimming and diving
211 2011–12 Marcin Tarczyński Men's swimming and diving
212 2011–12 Cindy Tran Women's swimming and diving
213 2012–13 Aggie Nowinski
Erica Rippe
Paparangi Hipango
Kara Kohler
Jenn Helssen
Kendall Chase
Maggie Simpson
Clair Premzic
Rachel Ersted
Rowing
214 2012–13 Rachel Bootsma Women's swimming and diving
215 2012–13 Max Homa Men's golf
216 2012–13 Caitlin Leverenz Women's swimming and diving
217 2012–13 Elizabeth Pelton Women's swimming and diving
218 2012–13 Tom Shields Men's swimming and diving
219 2012–13 Tom Shields Men's swimming and diving
220 2013–14 Dorothee Beckendorff
Stephanie Kraemer
Charlotte Passot
Anne Duval
Mary Thomasmyer
Rowing
221 2013–14 Tyler Messerschmidt
Ryan Murphy
Tony Cox
Seth Stubblefield
Men's swimming and diving
222 2013–14 Ryan Murphy
Chuck Katis
Tony Cox
Tyler Messerschmidt
Men's swimming and diving
223 2013–14 Rachael Acker
Caroline Piehl
Elizabeth Pelton
Missy Franklin
Women's swimming and diving
224 2013–14 Ryan Murphy
Chuck Katis
Marcin Tarczyński
Seth Stubblefield
Men's swimming and diving
225 2013–14 Missy Franklin Women's swimming and diving
226 2013–14 Ryan Murphy Men's swimming and diving
227 2013–14 Ryan Murphy Men's swimming and diving
228 2014–15 Ryan Murphy
Chuck Katis
Justin Lynch
Tyler Messerschmidt
Men's swimming and diving
229 2014–15 Kaylin Bing
Missy Franklin
Rachel Bootsma
Farida Osman
Women's swimming and diving
230 2014–15 Cierra Runge
Camille Cheng
Elizabeth Pelton
Missy Franklin
Women's swimming and diving
231 2014–15 Rachel Bootsma
Marina García
Noemie Thomas
Farida Osman
Women's swimming and diving
232 2014–15 Rachel Bootsma Women's swimming and diving
233 2014–15 Missy Franklin Women's swimming and diving
234 2014–15 Missy Franklin Women's swimming and diving
235 2014–15 Missy Franklin Women's swimming and diving
236 2014–15 Ryan Murphy Men's swimming and diving
237 2014–15 Ryan Murphy Men's swimming and diving
238 2015–16 Francis Wood
Kendall Ritter
Hunter Deuel
Eleanor Howe
Riley Brown
Rowing
239 2015–16 Sarah Schwartz
Katherine Kelly
Charlotte Passot
Ellen Heile
Dana Moffat
Sydney Payne
Roisin Duffy
Charlotte Wesselmann
Rachel Lether
Rowing
240 2015–16 Farida Osman
Kristen Vredeveld
Valarie Hull
Amy Bilquist
Women's swimming and diving
241 2015–16 Rachel Bootsma Women's swimming and diving
242 2015–16 Ryan Murphy Men's swimming and diving
243 2015–16 Ryan Murphy Men's swimming and diving
244 2015–16 Josh Prenot Men's swimming and diving
245 2016–17 Abbey Weitzeil
Maddie Murphy
Amy Bilquist
Farida Osman
Women's swimming and diving
246 2016–17 Kathleen Baker
Abbey Weitzeil
Noemie Thomas
Farida Osman
Women's swimming and diving
247 2016–17 Kathleen Baker Women's swimming and diving
248 2016–17 Kathleen Baker Women's swimming and diving
249 2016–17 Kathleen Baker Women's swimming and diving
250 2016–17 Ryan Murphy Men's swimming and diving
251 2016–17 Ryan Murphy Men's swimming and diving
252 2016–17 Farida Osman Women's swimming and diving
253 2017–18 Hannah Christopher
Charlotte Wesselmann
Mia Croonquist
Juliane Faralisch
Dana Moffat
Chloe Betts
Maddison Brown
Sydney Payne
Bea Bliemel
Rowing
254 2017–18 Riley Brown
Alex Floyd
Ellen Heile
Katie De Haas
Zoe Feist
Rowing
255 2017–18 Kathleen Baker Women's swimming and diving

* Including pre-NCAA men's and women's tennis and women's rowing

Notable club sports

Ice hockey

California Ice Hockey Team is an ACHA Division II program, competing in the Pacific 8 Intercollegiate Hockey Conference. The team is coached by Chris Linden, who took over as head coach in 2018.

Volleyball

The University of California department of athletics sponsors a varsity women's volleyball program without a men's equivalent program at the NCAA/varsity level; therefore, California only competes in intercollegiate men's volleyball at the club level. Along with the men's club volleyball program, there is also a women's club team separate from the women's varsity team. According to the UC Berkeley Recreational Sports page, the club men's volleyball program has won a total of six national championships. Occasionally, members of the club volleyball team will help the women's varsity volleyball team with practices and open scrimmages.

Taekwondo

The California taekwondo team has won 32 national team championships from 1976 through 2018 (includes 3 men's and one women's team titles prior to the adoption of overall scoring).

Athletic facilities

California Memorial Stadium

California Memorial Stadium in 2012

California Memorial Stadium is the home field for California's football program. The venue opened in 1923 and seated between 72,000 and 80,000 fans until the 2010 football season (its final configuration before the renovation seated 71,799), making it northern California's largest football stadium in terms of seating capacity; however, the stadium's capacity dropped to 62,467 seats after the renovation was completed.

Simpson Center

The Simpson Center (known as the Student Athlete High Performance Center or SAHPC during construction) is the new high-performance center for California's student athletes, located right next to California Memorial Stadium on Piedmont Avenue. The new center opened in the fall of 2011 and by January 2012, the final team (football) had moved into the facility. The Simpson Center is home to 13 of California's 32 intercollegiate athletic programs, including football, Men's Rugby, Women's Lacrosse, Men's and Women's Gymnastics, Men's and Women's Golf, Men's and Women's Soccer, Men's and Women's Crew, Women's Field Hockey, and softball. According to the University of California, the facility is a 142,000-square-foot (13,200 m2) complex that will provide "year round access for over 450 student athletes."

Haas Pavilion

Exterior of Haas Pavilion.

Walter A. Haas, Jr. Pavilion is the home of California's men's and women's basketball, women's volleyball, and men's and women's gymnastics teams. The arena is located in the middle of the main University of California sports complex, overlooking Evans Diamond (baseball) and Edwards Stadium (track/soccer). The arena was originally constructed in 1933 as the Men's Gym. It was renamed, in 1959, Harmon Gym after Oakland financier A.K.P. Harmon, who in 1879 donated the funds to build Cal's first indoor athletic facility. The playing surface, after being known as simply "Room 100" when the arena opened, was renamed Pete Newell Court in 1987 in honor of Pete Newell, who led Cal to the national championship in 1959. Proposals for replacing the old gym were bandied about from the 1970s onward, but sentiment was strongly in favor of its reconstruction. As a result, the arena was heavily renovated from 1997 to 1999 after a donation of about $11 million from Walter A. Haas, Jr. of Levi Strauss & Co., constructing a new seating bowl within the existing walls.

Recreational Sports Facility

The Recreational Sports Facility is a 100,000 square foot athletics center that is attached to Haas Pavilion and is located on Bancroft Avenue. The RSF features many different rooms for many different activities including, but not limited to: basketball, weight lifting, racquetball, handball, squash, volleyball, and badminton. Attached to the facility is the RSF Field House which is home to many of California's club and intramural teams and has, in the past, hosted the Cal women's volleyball team while Haas Pavilion was under construction. Also attached to the RSF is the Spieker Aquatics Complex, which is home to the California men's and women's water polo and men's and women's swimming and diving programs.

Evans Diamond

Evans Diamond is California's baseball stadium, it opened in 1933 and currently has a seating capacity of 2,500. Evans Diamond is located in the UC sports complex in the southwest corner of campus, pressed between Edwards Stadium to the west (right field) and Haas Pavilion to the east. Originally named Edwards Field, it was renamed after Clint Evans, the Cal head coach from 1930 to 1954. The stadium was renovated in 1992 at a cost of $275,000, paid for by the donations of UC alumni. Construction was done by RNT Landscaping, a San Leandro landscaping company. The stadium is considered inadequate to host regional and super regional games for the NCAA tournament because of its lack of lights.

Other facilities

  • Oakland Arena (Men's Basketball 1997-1999)
  • Clark Kerr Sand Courts (Beach volleyball)
  • Edwards Stadium (Soccer, Track & Field)
  • Hellman Tennis Complex (Tennis)
  • Legends Aquatics Center (Swimming and Diving, Water Polo)
  • Levine-Fricke Field (Softball)
  • Spieker Aquatics Complex (Water Polo, Swimming & Diving)
  • T. Gary Rogers Rowing Center (Crew)
  • Underhill Field (Field Hockey)
  • Witter Rugby Field (Rugby)

California spirit

School colors and mascot

Various athletic shirts in the blue and gold colors
Oski, the mascot of the University of California

Blue and gold have been Cal's official colors since 1875. The dark blue represents California's sky and ocean, and Yale University, the alma mater of several of the university's founders, including its first president, Henry Durant. Gold is a reference to the state of California's nickname, the "Golden State." The shade of gold varies from a more metallic gold on the university seal, and a yellow-gold (also known as California Gold) that is in use by the athletic department. Because of the university's use of blue and gold, the state of California's de facto colors were blue and gold from around 1913 to 1951 and became the official state colors in 1951.

Since 1895, the athletic teams of the University of California have officially been known as the "California Golden Bears."

University of California Marching Band

The University of California Marching Band, usually shortened to Cal Band, is the marching band for the University of California, Berkeley. While the Cal Band is student-run, it is administered under the auspices of the university and represents Cal at sporting events and social gatherings. The name of the band is "The University of California Band" by the constitution, but is typically called "The University of California Marching Band" or "The Cal Band". When the band marches out of Memorial Stadium's North Tunnel for football pre-games, it is referred to as "The Pacesetter of College Marching Bands, the Pride of California". When in attendance at basketball games or other small sporting events, a smaller subset known as the "Straw Hat Band" represents the UC Marching Band.

Songs

Fight for California
Primary fight song

University of California Rally Committee

The University of California Rally Committee, usually shortened to Rally Comm, is the official guardian of the University of California's spirit and traditions. The committee is in charge of the protection of the Stanford Axe (while Cal is in possession of it), the Bonfire Rally, the Cal flags, the California Victory Cannon, Homecoming Rally, the upkeep of the Big C, and many other spirit related activities. Rally Comm is completely student-run and can be found at almost every major sporting event and many other events throughout the Bay Area and country. The most distinguishing feature of the University of California Rally Committee are the blue and gold striped rugby shirts that serve as the official uniform of the committee.

The Bench

The Bench is the student cheering section for the University of California men's basketball team. Located inside Haas Pavilion, The Bench holds up to 900 students who cheer on their California Golden Bears at home basketball games. Students who sit on The Bench receive an annual Bench T-shirt each year and continue to make Haas Pavilion one of the loudest basketball arenas in the Pac-12 Conference. The Bench prides itself on standing the entire game and ensuring that the arena is a hostile place for any opposing team to play.

Although exact dates are not known, the tradition of The Bench was drastically changed in October 2000 when renovations on Haas Pavilion were completed and put a row of portable chairs between the student section and the court. University officials called the move necessary for the protection of referees and players, but students were angry at the move because it further removed them from the action.

Stanford rivalry

California shares a traditional sports and academic rivalry with nearby Stanford University. Both schools operate in the San Francisco Bay Area with the University of California in the East Bay and Stanford in Santa Clara County. While the schools have a rich athletic rivalry with the football programs meeting 124 times, they also share an academic rivalry: the University of California, Berkeley, is commonly considered one of the best public university nationally while Stanford University is thought of as being one of the best private universities in the country. Athletic events between the two schools are usually signified by being the "Big whatever", examples include: the Big Game (football), Big Tip Off (basketball), Big Spike (Volleyball), Big Splash (Water Polo), Big Meet (Track & Field), Big Freeze (Club Ice Hockey), et cetera. Women's basketball does not follow the normal naming template for games between the two schools and is simply known as "The Battle of the Bay."

The annual football game features both teams vying for the Stanford Axe.

Trophies

Stanford Axe

The University of California Rally Committee in possession of the Stanford Axe

The Stanford Axe is a trophy awarded to the winner of the annual Big Game, a college football match-up between the University of California Golden Bears and the Stanford University Cardinal. The trophy consists of an axe-head mounted on a large wooden plaque, along with the scores of past Big Games. California is currently in possession of the Axe after winning the 2023 Big Game in Palo Alto.

Years California has been in possession of the Axe:
71 years total: 31 years pre-trophy, 39 years as the Big Game Trophy (2 ties)
1899–1930, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1941, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950*, 1951, 1952, 1953*, 1954, 1956, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1967, 1970,
1972, 1975, 1979, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1986, 1993, 1994, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2019, 2021, 2022, 2023
*In 1950, and 1953, the Big Game ended in a tie. Because California was already in possession of the Axe, it remained in Berkeley.

World Cup

The World Cup is awarded to the winner of the annual rugby union series between the University of California Golden Bears and the University of British Columbia Thunderbirds. In rugby, California's traditional rival is British Columbia, not Stanford, which led to the creation of the World Cup. California was the 2013 World Cup winner, defeating UBC 28–18 in Berkeley on February 16, 2013, and 38–6 in Vancouver on March 24, 2013.

Scrum Axe

Although California's main rival in rugby is British Columbia, the rivalry between California and Stanford in rugby has been going on for more than a century. The trophy awarded to the winner of the California-Stanford rugby match is known as the "Scrum Axe", which is a play on the "Stanford Axe", the trophy awarded to whichever school wins the annual rugby contest. California retained its hold on the Scrum Axe on January 26, 2013, in Berkeley, winning their 17th straight meeting over the Cardinal 176–0.

Olympic representation

Throughout the years, the University of California has been well represented in the Summer Olympic games with Cal athletes winning 90 gold medals, 40 silver medals, and 28 bronze medals. Despite the fact that the university sponsors no sports that compete in the Winter Olympics, California does have 1 gold medalist from the 1928 Winter Games.

At the 2016 Summer Olympics, California's at the time enrolled students won at total of 18 medals, including 9 gold ones. Sixteen of those medals were won in swimming.

GamesGoldSilverBronzeTotal
Summer Olympics904028158
Winter Olympics1001
Totals (2 entries)914028159

This page was last updated at 2024-04-17 22:39 UTC. Update now. View original page.

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