Chantefleurs et Chantefables

Chantefleurs et Chantefables is a song cycle for soprano and orchestra set to the poems of Robert Desnos[1] by the Polish composer Witold Lutosławski. The work was composed from 1989 to 1991 and was first performed at The Proms by the soprano Solveig Kringlebotn and the BBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of the composer on August 8, 1991.[2] The piece is Lutosławski's second composition set to the poetry of Robert Desnos, following 1975's Les Espaces du sommeil.[3][4]

Composition

Structure

Chantefleurs et Chantefables has a duration of approximately 16 minutes and is composed in nine movements:[2]}}

  1. La Belle-de-Nuit[1]:1351[5]
  2. La Sauterelle[1]:1330[6]
  3. La Véronique[1]:1345[7]
  4. L'Eglantine, l'aubépine et la glycine[1]:1349[8]
  5. La Tortue[1]:1336[9]
  6. La Rose[1]:1350[10]
  7. L'Alligator[1]:1332[11]
  8. L'Angélique[1]:1343[12]
  9. Le Papillon[1]:1327[13]

Instrumentation

The work is scored for solo soprano and a small orchestra consisting of flute, oboe, clarinet (doubling bass clarinet and E-flat clarinet), bassoon (doubling contrabassoon), trumpet, horn, trombone, percussion, timpani, harp, piano (doubling celesta), and strings.[2]

Reception

Chantefleurs et Chantefables has been praised by music critics. Andrew Clements of The Guardian described the composition as "a series of tiny epigrammatic settings inhabiting a child-like surrealist world, which Lutosławski illuminates with wonderful precision."[14] Keith Potter of BBC Music Magazine compared the piece to Lutosławski's Chain 1, observing that they are "so exquisite that they verge on the precious."[15] The composer Russell Platt similarly described it as "one of the most gracious and affecting works of Lutosławski's last years."[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Dumas, Marie-Claire, ed. (1999). Robert Desnos: Œuvres (in French). Paris: Gallimard. ISBN 978-2-0707-5427-4.
  2. ^ a b c Lutosławski, Witold (1990). "Chantefleurs et Chantefables". G. Schirmer Inc. Retrieved October 5, 2016.
  3. ^ Lutosławski, Witold (1975). "Les Espaces du sommeil". G. Schirmer Inc. Retrieved October 5, 2016.
  4. ^ a b Platt, Russell (2005). Woodstra, Chris; Brennan, Gerald; Schrott, Allen (eds.). All Music Guide to Classical Music: The Definitive Guide to Classical Music. Backbeat Books. p. 775. ISBN 0879308656.
  5. ^ Desnos, Robert. "La Belle-de-Nuit" (in French). Un Jour Un Poème. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  6. ^ Desnos, Robert. "La Sauterelle" (in French). Un Jour Un Poème. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  7. ^ Desnos, Robert. "La Véronique" (in French). Un Jour Un Poème. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  8. ^ Desnos, Robert. "L'Eglantine, l'aubépine et la glycine" (in French). Un Jour Un Poème. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  9. ^ Desnos, Robert. "La Tortue" (in French). Un Jour Un Poème. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  10. ^ Desnos, Robert. "La Rose" (in French). Un Jour Un Poème. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  11. ^ Desnos, Robert. "L'Alligator" (in French). Un Jour Un Poème. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  12. ^ Desnos, Robert. "L'Angélique" (in French). Un Jour Un Poème. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  13. ^ Desnos, Robert. "Le Papillon" (in French). Un Jour Un Poème. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  14. ^ Clements, Andrew (1 September 2011). "Lutosławski: Chantefleurs et Chantefables; Les Espaces du Sommeil; Paroles Tissées, etc – review". The Guardian. Retrieved October 5, 2016.
  15. ^ Potter, Keith (20 January 2012). "Lutoslawski: Chantefleurs et chantefables; Chain 1; Preludes and Fugue; Five Songs". BBC Music Magazine. Retrieved October 5, 2016.

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