Post-romanticism

Post-romanticism or Postromanticism refers to a range of cultural endeavors and attitudes emerging in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, after the period of Romanticism.

Post-romanticism in literature

The period of post-romanticism in poetry is defined as the mid-to-late nineteenth century, but includes the much earlier poetry of Letitia Elizabeth Landon and Tennyson.

List of notable post-romantic writers

Post-romanticism in music

Post-romanticism in music refers to composers who wrote classical symphonies, operas, and songs in transitional style that constituted a blend of late romantic and early modernist musical languages. Arthur Berger described the mysticism of La Jeune France as post-Romanticism rather than neo-Romanticism.

Post-romantic composers created music that used traditional forms combined with advanced harmony. Béla Bartók, for example, "in such Strauss-influenced works as Duke Bluebeard's Castle," may be described as having still used "dissonance ['such intervals as fourths and sevenths'] in traditional forms of music for purposes of post-romantic expression, not simply always as an appeal to the primal art of sound".

List of other notable post-romantic composers


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