Temporal styloid process

Styloid process (temporal)
Right side of the skull. Styloid process shown in red
Right temporal bone and mandible (styloid process labeled at bottom)
Details
Identifiers
Latinprocessus styloideus ossis temporalis
TA98A02.1.06.047
TA2683
FMA52877
Anatomical terms of bone

The temporal styloid process is a slender bony process of the temporal bone extending downward and forward from the undersurface of the temporal bone just below the ear.[citation needed] The styloid process gives attachments to several muscles, and ligaments.

Structure

The styloid process is a slender and pointed bony process of the temporal bone projecting anteroinferiorly from the inferior surface of the temporal bone just below the ear.[citation needed] Its length normally ranges from just under 3 cm to just over 4 cm. It is usually nearly straight, but may be curved in some individuals.

Its proximal (tympanohyal) part is ensheathed by the tympanic part of the temporal bone (vaginal process), whereas its distal (stylohyal) part gives attachment to several structures.

Attachments

The styloid process gives attachments to several muscles, and ligaments. It serves as an anchor point for several muscles associated with the tongue and larynx.[citation needed]

Relations

The parotid gland is situated laterally to the styloid process, the external carotid artery passes by its apex, the facial nerve crosses its base, and the attachment of the stylopharyngeus muscle separates it from the internal jugular vein medially.

Clinical significance

A small percentage of the population will suffer from an elongation of the styloid process and stylohyoid ligament calcification. This condition is also known as Eagle syndrome. The tissues in the throat rub on the styloid process during the act of swallowing with resulting pain along the glossopharyngeal nerve. There is also pain upon turning the head or extending the tongue. Other symptoms may include voice alteration, cough, dizziness, migraines, occipital neuralgia, pain in teeth and jaw and sinusitis or bloodshot eyes.[citation needed]

Development

The styloid process arises from endochondral ossification of the cartilage from the second pharyngeal arch.[citation needed]

Additional images



This page was last updated at 2024-04-18 20:28 UTC. Update now. View original page.

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